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In the early 1900s, manufactures of Turkish and Egyptian cigarettes tripled their sales and became major competitors to leading brands. The New York-based Greek tobacconist Soterios Anargyros produced hand-rolled Murad cigarettes, made of pure Turkish tobacco.<br/><br/>

Many of the Murad advertisements others incorporated Orientalist motifs or models dressed in Middle Eastern dress.
In the early 1900s, manufactures of Turkish and Egyptian cigarettes tripled their sales and became major competitors to leading brands. The New York-based Greek tobacconist Soterios Anargyros produced hand-rolled Murad cigarettes, made of pure Turkish tobacco.<br/><br/>

Many of the Murad advertisements others incorporated Orientalist motifs or models dressed in Middle Eastern dress.
In the early 1900s, manufactures of Turkish and Egyptian cigarettes tripled their sales and became major competitors to leading brands. The New York-based Greek tobacconist Soterios Anargyros produced hand-rolled Murad cigarettes, made of pure Turkish tobacco.<br/><br/>

Many of the Murad advertisements others incorporated Orientalist motifs or models dressed in Middle Eastern dress.
In the early 1900s, manufactures of Turkish and Egyptian cigarettes tripled their sales and became major competitors to leading brands. One of the earlier Turkish tobacco cigarettes, Mogul, was introduced in 1892 by the New York-based Greek tobacconist Soterios Anargyros.<br/><br/>

Though likely made of a Turkish blend, Moguls were advertised as 'Egyptian Cigarettes'. Many of the Mogul advertisements presented high society models in Western apparel, positioning the cigarette as a luxury product, while others incorporated Orientalist motifs or models dressed in Middle Eastern dress.
In the early 1900s, manufactures of Turkish and Egyptian cigarettes tripled their sales and became major competitors to leading brands. The New York-based Greek tobacconist Soterios Anargyros produced hand-rolled Murad cigarettes, made of pure Turkish tobacco.<br/><br/>

Many of the Murad advertisements others incorporated Orientalist motifs or models dressed in Middle Eastern dress.
In the early 1900s, manufactures of Turkish and Egyptian cigarettes tripled their sales and became major competitors to leading brands. The New York-based Greek tobacconist Soterios Anargyros produced hand-rolled Murad cigarettes, made of pure Turkish tobacco.<br/><br/>

Many of the Murad advertisements  others incorporated Orientalist motifs or models dressed in Middle Eastern dress.
In the early 1900s, manufactures of Turkish and Egyptian cigarettes tripled their sales and became major competitors to leading brands. The New York-based Greek tobacconist Soterios Anargyros produced hand-rolled Murad cigarettes, made of pure Turkish tobacco.<br/><br/>

Many of the Murad advertisements others incorporated Orientalist motifs or models dressed in Middle Eastern dress.
In the early 1900s, manufactures of Turkish and Egyptian cigarettes tripled their sales and became major competitors to leading brands. The New York-based Greek tobacconist Soterios Anargyros produced hand-rolled Murad cigarettes, made of pure Turkish tobacco.<br/><br/>

Many of the Murad advertisements others incorporated Orientalist motifs or models dressed in Middle Eastern dress.
Homosexuality in China was traditionally widespread in the region. Historically, homosexual relationships were regarded as a normal facet of life, and the existence of homosexuality in China has been well documented since ancient times. Many early Chinese emperors are speculated to have had homosexual relationships, often accompanied by heterosexual ones. Opposition to homosexuality and the rise of homophobia did not become firmly established in China until the 19th and 20th centuries, through the Westernization efforts of the late Qing Dynasty and early Republic of China. Homosexuality was banned in the People's Republic of China, until it was legalised in 1997.<br/><br/>

Traditional terms for homosexuality included 'the passion of the cut sleeve' (断袖之癖, Mandarin, Pinyin: duànxiù zhī pǐ), and 'the bitten peach' (分桃 Pinyin: fēntáo). Other, less literary, terms have included 'male trend' (男風 Pinyin: nánfēng), 'allied brothers' (香火兄弟 Pinyin: xiānghuǒ xiōngdì), and 'the passion of Longyang' (龍陽癖 Pinyin: lóngyángpǐ), referencing a homoerotic anecdote about Lord Long Yang in the Warring States Period. The formal modern word for homosexuality/homosexual is tongxinglian (同性戀, Pinyin: tóngxìngliàn, literally same-sex relations/love) or tongxinglian zhe (同性戀者, Pinyin: tóngxìngliàn zhě, homosexual people). Instead of this formal word, 'tongzhi' (同志 Pinyin: tóngzhì), simply a head-rhyme word, is more commonly used in the gay community.
In the early 1900s, manufactures of Turkish and Egyptian cigarettes tripled their sales and became major competitors to leading brands. The New York-based Greek tobacconist Soterios Anargyros produced hand-rolled Murad cigarettes, made of pure Turkish tobacco.<br/><br/>

Many of the Murad advertisements others incorporated Orientalist motifs or models dressed in Middle Eastern dress.